I decided then to run, everywhere I go.

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Myrtle Edwards Park to Downtown – Seattle, WA

 

It all started in october 2011, when I decided to register for an 8 Mile run. I remember that day as if it was yesterday. I was both eager and afraid about the idea of running without any specific preparation. Not that I was too confident about the race, but I was too busy focusing on my professional work, that I couldn’t find enough time to train well for this race.

It didn’t go the way I expected; I remember I started struggling at about 5 miles and after running through pain for about 3 miles, I felt down when crossing the finish line. I wasn’t happy with the way I ran that race (especially the last few miles), but It was a challenge I wanted to complete so I felt a little satisfaction all the same.

How I became addicted to running …

Since this first experience, and because I now run more frequently, I have discovered the pleasure of running. And because I have been running at regular intervals for a while, I’ve noticed some changes in my everyday life. Other than the physical and mental benefits that everybody is aware of. It boosts my productivity at work and it made me feel better all the time.

I was so used to running that even when I was sick and lying in bed, my body continued to crave a run. I also consider running as a great stress-reliever: It helps you feel energetic all the time and It’s also an efficient way to drop pounds (I lost about 26 pounds since I started running).

Like many runners, I’ve also experienced reaching the “runner’s hight“, feeling euphoric after a long run when your body starts releasing endorphins; those feel-good hormones that help you feel good, comfortable and relaxed.

Challenging myself …

There’s nothing more empowering than setting a personal goal and achieving it. This rule also apply to running; when I started running, my main motivation was to lose weight. And, after many months of practicing, I decided to push my limits by improving my personal records on time and distance. I used to track my progress using RunKeeper, Endomondo and Strava which are all great tools to manage running activities and to help you achieve goals.

As I was always running the same route over and over again, getting motivated for a run became much harder. It was time to look for new challenges as running became a part of my lifestyle. And because I was traveling a lot between Europe, North Africa and America, I developed the idea of running in every city I went to; experiencing new routes and meeting other runners all around the globe. I was so excited about this new challenge that I started looking for the best running paths that fit my schedule during my last trip to the USA.

How did it go?

Now that I’m back in France after a three week stay in America where I ran in NY, Miami, Portland and Seattle I’m more excited about this new chanllenge than ever before. I was always so excited about trying new routes and I met many passionate runners in Central Park. It was so cool running along Miami Beach, and even if it was raining all day in Portland, I enjoyed running along the Waterfront park from where the view was so inspiring.

Seattle was my last running stop (Picture above). I moved then to San Francisco where I had a health problem (nothing related to my running activities) which prevented me from completing a last run before flying back to Paris.

And now that I’m back home and recovering, I’m waiting for my personal doctor to allow me running a 7 Mile race which is better known as the “10km l’Équipe” and which will take place here in Paris next week.

What’s next?

As it seems that my running activities fit well with my travel plans, I will probably be running Algiers next August,  Rouen in october and Berlin in February.

If you’re a passionate runner like me, feel free to share your experience and to follow me on Runkeeper, Endomondo and Strava.


Myrtle Edwards Park to Downtown – Seattle, WA

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